Search This Blog

Trevor Almeida, Aussie eco movie maker


Trevor Almeida's Film, Secrets of the Kimberley, Winner of the 2018 Best Ecosystem Film

Trevor Almeida is the son of Alfreida (Class of 55) and Bona Almeida (ex Nairobi), Melbourne, Australia

Abstract: Scientists and artists attempt to explore the isolated Kimberley marine region through some innovative photographic techniques and randomly discover a new natural world. The Kimberley is one of the most ecologically diverse areas of the world. Its marine ecosystems are amongst the world’s most pristine. At 424500 square kilometres, the Kimberley is bigger than Italy or Germany and it has over 3000 uninhabited islands. This documentary takes you on an expedition into this remote region with a team made up of an artist and scientists. What they find redefines their values and how they view the natural world. It showcases one of the last great wilderness areas through incredible wildlife-great and small.


Trevor has been producing films, video and interactive media for several 20 years. He is committed to films on the Environment and has produced over 15 films covering subjects from Climate to Biodiscovery. His recent documentary commissions include “The Secrets Of the Kimberley, Western Australia’s Ocean Environment, and CO2 and our Coral Reefs. In 2010 his independent film My Home the Block was selected for the F4 program at the Australian International Documentary Conference and has been broadcast national. His latest work on the Kimberley has had theatrical screenings through festivals such as the Environmental Film Festival Melbourne and has been invited to festivals internationally. In the past he worked as an editor for 100meter films in Japan on the award winning feature film Firefly Dreams.

He currently runs Geonewmedia, a production company focusing on sharing science and environment communication through the power of online video. In his spare time he runs small events for the Melbourne Sustainability Professionals and TEDxStKilda.





THE SECRETS OF THE KIMBERLEY
Making the invisible Visible

Synopsis 1

Scientists and artists attempt to explore the isolated Kimberley marine region through some innovative photographic techniques and randomly discover a new natural world.

The Kimberley is one of the most ecologically diverse areas of the world. Its marine ecosystems are amongst the world's most pristine. At 424500 square kilometres the Kimberley is bigger than Italy or Germany and it has over 3000 uninhabited islands.

This documentary takes you on an expedition into this remote region with a team made up of an artist and scientists. What they find redefines their values and how they view the natural world. It showcases one of the last great wilderness areas through incredible wildlife-great and small.





Synopsis 2

On board the “Olivia J” under the command of a veteran fisherman a group of scientists and a photographer embark on a journey into one of Australia's least explored marine frontiers-The Kimberley. What they find redefines their values and how they view the natural world. It showcases one of the last great wilderness areas through incredible wildlife-great and small.

This is a look at a wild space from an angle rarely seen. The Kimberley is a place lost in time. No towns, no roads, no people. At times it has a chilling sense of loneliness and silence. A world without humans. In a strange paradox, if you look, it is teaming with life. All you need to do is get there and wait. From the mighty blow of a giant humpback whale to the crackles of armies of micro crabs feeding, this is a showcase of life great and small.This film highlights the rare species in this region through some amazing photography and describes the marine science being undertaken to improve our understanding of this incredible part of Western Australia.

Tags

Kimberley, Western Australia, Wildlife, Marine Science, Photography, Anthropomorphic, expeditions adventure, corals discovery channel, NGC, National Geographic, Geo, Nature, Wildlife photography, Humpback Whales, Whales calf, whale birthing waters, coral reefs, discovery, hyperspectral surveys, geonewmedia. Palace, Environmental Film Festival Melbourne, EFFM, Trevor Almeida.


Biography

Trevor Almeida-Producer

Trevor has been producing films, video and interactive media for over 18 years. His past documentary commissions include Western Australia’s Marine Environment, Carbon Dioxide and Our Coral Reefs. In 2010 his independent film My Home the Block was selected for the F4 program at the AIDC and has screened on the cable network through NITV. He worked as an  editor for 100meter films in Japan on their award winning feature film Firefly Dreams. He currently runs Geonewmedia, a production company focusing on science, innovation and technology digital media.



FAQ of Trevor Almeida during the making of Secrets Of The Kimberley.


How did the Secrets of the Kimberley come about and how was it financed?


This is not the kind of film we at Geonewmedia usually make.

We usually make environmental films, training films, business profiles promoting science, environment and innovation. We usually work with scientists, Indigenous communities and sustainability industries to promote their vision or products.
The Secrets of The Kimberley however was basically an independent production unsupported by any government funds or industry yet we realise it is a privilege to visit this country and make this film. The expedition and film was funded by research, a private investor and Geonewmedia. Our challenge was to reveal the values of The Kimberley Marine Region - in Art , Science and Indigenous Knowledge.


What motivated you to make this film.


I was born in Kenya and as a child loved watching wild animals in their natural environment. But when I got to the Kimberley I was totally moved with how remote and vast this region is. As we flew over we literally saw the road end.
Scientists believe the Kimberley is one of the most ecologically diverse areas of the world and its marine ecosystems are amongst the world’s most pristine. Surveys of a mere 3 islands have recorded 280 species of coral.
We have only just begun to understand its true value. I just wanted to bring this amazing region to people who cannot afford to reach it .


What did you discover from the experience of shooting the film


It still gives me shivers!

Shooting this film in the Kimberley made me realise that a lot of Australians will never experience the unique and outstanding wildlife they have in their own back yard.
Unfortunately the Kimberley is " out of reach " for most of us. This means out of sight, out of mind and that it a real shame. Getting to the Kimberley is only available to a privileged few. It can cost us $10000 just to get on a special vessel to take you there. There are no roads, the nearest air strip is on a private mine site. You need a special vessel and an experienced captain to navigate there through the unsurveyed waters and giant tides. This is indigenous country and remains one of the planets most uninhabited regions.


I was lucky to spend some time there while on the Olivia J. What we found was a unique wild world of creatures great and small.


What were the challenges in making such a film


Actually you need to be always ready when making an expedition documentary.

The biggest challenge was the giant tides. Because there vary so dramatically twice a day up to 12 meters it made getting in and out of reefs precarious and dangerous. As a result the schedule of the scientists would change all the time and we would need to re plan our sequences on the fly. Several time we would set up our time lapse cameras or shots and we would need to escape on short notice because of ruff weather or the tide was approaching too fast. A lot of the areas are unsurveyed so we had no maps to help us. Generally the camera crew had to be up before light and end after dusk so there was no time for sleep. We did most of our preparation in the afternoon when the sun was too hot for photography.

How did you manage safety


Thank goodness we had no heroes. Safety came first because if you had an accident it would be a nightmare. Helicopter would be the only viable rescue and that would take time. The rocks faces are jagged and sharp, so it would be easy to slip and slice your self. That said we did have some injuries. The second camera twisted his leg but thankfully nothing serious.


Reviews-The Secrets of the Kimberley


“ Amazing extremely well done.. very emotive” S Jackson- Innate Ecology. “Really powerful. I was moved by it! ” S Young.
“The confluence of art and science looking at an issue as important as the Kimberley….a brilliant piece of work” - R Wyatt-Think Impact.
“I loved the photography. The interplay of science and photography…Skillfully told story.” C Tafford -Alpha Green.
“People have to see it . The Kimberley is awesome!” A Foran -Hagar Australia.








Production stills.










No comments:

Post a Comment